Bark


Good morning/evening  Everyone!

When we are in grade school, somewhere along the line we learn that if you are going to draw a tree, it is going to have a brown trunk and a green top.  My basic trees in kindergarten up looked something like this:

Tree

Basic Tree

When I wanted to get fancy, I would add branches to the top of the tree, and a hole such as a bird might like to nest in.

Fancy Tree

More Fancy Tree

The truth about trees, as is often the case, is much more wonderful in real life.

Take bark, for instance. The next time you have a minute and you are going by a stand of trees, take a minute to stop and look just at the bark on the trees. Notice how each type of tree bark has its own color and shape and patterns. Notice how almost none of them are the true brown that we used in grade school – the marvelous variations of gray and brown and shades in between is unlimited!

While I am by no means a botanist or an arborist, I do recognize a few kinds of trees, so I though I would share photographs of their bark with you, just to get you started.

Oak tree bark

Oak Tree Bark

This beautiful oak tree was right outside our camper this weekend at Joe Wheeler State Park in Rogersville, Alabama. Here is a photograph of the tree with me looking up that is just too pretty not to share.

Oak Tree

Oak Tree

Dogwood tree bark

Dogwood Tree Bark

In the spring, the beautiful dogwoods grace Southern woods and yards with unique, four-petaled white flowers. Here is a picture of one dogwood tree’s bark last weekend.

pine tree bark

Pine Tree Bark (on the left)

Pine trees also abound in the South.

Crepe Myrtle Bark

Crepe Myrtle Bark: Photograph taken and shown on colorlandscapes.wordpress.com

Very few flowers on trees survive the hot, humid Southern summer, but the crepe myrtle is one of the few that do. (I’m not entirely sure if the crepe myrtle is a tree or shrub, but it definitely has wood in its trunk!) It’s bark is very smooth, and a sort of tan color.

Magnolia Trunk

Magnolia

One of the other trees that bear summer flowers is the stately magnolia tree, the grande dame of Southern flora. (You just can’t quite say “magnolia tree” without putting “stately” in front of it. I tried, without success.)

From five trees, we have five different kinds of bark.  This level of texture is something we don’t often take the time to really view and admire, but sometime this week or weekend, take just a few minutes to do so.  The sense of wonder and admiration at the variety and abundance of nature’s giants will be well worth your time.

Have a great day!

Nancy

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2 responses to “Bark

  1. Nancy, I enjoyed reading your post today! I agree that something that we see everyday like trees are a true wonder. You are correct that we miss looking at the bark of trees. Thanks so much for sharing and I will notice tree barks more often.

    Emily

  2. Now we know why only God can make a tree – such intricate barking work.

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